Sunday, 26 August 2012

PEOPLE OF MALAWI

PEOPLE OF MALAWI (ETHNIC GROUPS)

CREATION.


WE CAME FROM HEAVEN IN A FLASH OF WATER FALLING ON DRY LAND AROUND DZALANYAMA RANGES.THEN VEGETATION GREW ALL OVER THE WORLD ON DRY LAND.GARDEN OF EDEN WAS CREATED. GOD AND ALL ANIMALS LIVED TOGETHER HAPPILY.THE PROBLEMS OR DISAGREEMENTS CAME BECAUSE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOUR.MAN WAS VERY PLAYFULL.HE INVENTED A GAME OF STRIKING THE ROCK AGAINST ANOTHER.THE IMPACT PRODUCED A SPARK OF FIRE .GOD AND OTHER ANIMALS  HAD WARNED MAN ABOUT   SUCH MISCONDUCTS.MAN DID NOT HEED THE WARNING UNTILL ONEDAY  THE SPARK OF FIRE CAUGHT THE BUSH. THE GARDEN OF EDEN WAS ON FIRE!THERE WAS PANDAMONIAM.GOD WAS SAVED BY A COBWEB BY GOING BACK TO HEAVEN.AMINALS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO.SOME DESIDED TO LIVE WITH THE MAN .OTHERS FILLED WITH HATE FOR MAN REMAINED IN THE BUSH.HEAT INTIATED EVAPORATION OF WATER ,FORMED CLOUDS AND RAIN CAME TO EXTINGUISH THE FIRE.BECAUSE MAN HAS LOVE FOR FIRE ,HE KEPT  THE FIRE IN  A SECURE PLACE LIKE THE HOUSE TO AVOID IT TO COME TO AN END.THE FOLLOWING DAY MAN SET FIRE TO SOME BUSHES FOR HIS BENEFIT. THE END RESULT IS DEFORESTATION .GARDEN OF EDEN IS BEING DESTROYED -OUR HOME IS BEING DESTROYED.FIRE IS A SYMBOL OF HATRED AND DESTRUCTION.MAN WAS CURSED BY GOD TO DIE INORDER TO FORM MORE CLOUDS ,AND MORE RAIN UNTIL THE FIRE HE HAS MADE COME TO AN END. AT THAT TIME IS WHEN MAN WILL STOP DYING.WONDERFUL.THE SCIENTISTS  TODAY COPIED THIS THEOREM.WE NEW IT ALREADY.  Refer to Elijah,The earth visiting beings from heaven recounted by the people of West Africa.Blacks have known and visited many planets in the universe than any other races on earth.Any race who historicaly truly owns the past will own the present and future.

Malawi’s Ethnic Groups In Malawi there are more than 10 different ethnic tribes that are scattered all over the country. All these belong to one major African group of people called the Bantu. The Bantu are also found in other countries such as Mozambique, Zambia, Tanzania, Kenya and others. Below are the major ethnic groups found in Malawi.  
Chewa
The Chewa, previously known as the Malavi or Nyanja, came from Uluba in Katanga Province of Zaire. They left Zaire between 1200 and 1500 AD. There are several reasons that led to the migration of the Chewa from Zaire. These include tribal wars against their Bantu neighbours and secondly, they were in search of more land for grazing their animals. When the Chewa arrived in the present Malawi, they soon established themselves as rulers over the people they found because of their knowledge and influence in agriculture, traditional medicine, religion and a well-organised ruling system. As a result, their kingdom covered a wide area, from the Luangwa Valley in Zambia in the west; to the area beyond Ruo River in the east; then Dwangwa River in the north, and the Zambezi River in the south. Their language is known as Chichewa, which is also spoken in neighbouring countries of Zambia and Mozambique where it is known as Chinyanja. Chichewa is widely spoken in Malawi and assumes the role of a national language, though unofficially.   The Chewa of Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia jointly hold an annual cultural event in Katete District in the eastern province of Zambia to celebrate their Chewa heritage under their King Kalonga Gawa Undi whom they pay tribute to.
Lambya
The Lambya are a Bantu speaking people who came from the Bukinga in the Livingstone Mountains South East of Tanzania. They might have migrated into Malawi after the 18th Century in search of more land and probably because they were running away from slave trade by the Arabs and Portuguese. Two groups entered Malawi independently, one headed by Mwaulambiya and the other one headed by Sikwese. The language for Lambya is known as Chilambya. Today, the Lambya are found in the northern district of Chitipa.  
Lomwe
The Lomwe came from an area between Lake Malawi and the Indian Ocean in the present day Mozambique. They entered Malawi from the east. The Lomwe did not have an overall leader as was the case with other tribes when they entered Malawi because they came in small groups each with its own leader. They settled in the southern region of Malawi east of the Shire River. Their language is known as Chilomwe.
Ngonde and Nyakyusa
The Ngonde and Nyakyusa migrated from the north like all other Bantu tribes. The Ngonde were led by Syria, who was later known as Kyungu. They settled at the extreme north of Malawi which is now present day Karonga where they are still found today. The area was remote and as a result they did not suffer from Ngoni and Yao raids. The centre of Ngonde is the sacred Hill of Mbande, which stands in the bed of the Rukulu River, about 13 km from Lake Malawi. Their language is known as Kyangonde.
Ngoni
The Ngoni fled from Shaka Zulu who defeated many Ngoni Chiefs in South Africa. The Ngoni that entered Malawi came in two groups. One group was led by Zwangendaba Jere and the other was led by Ngwane Maseko. After their defeat in 1819, Zwangendaba Jere fled with his followers and settled at Mabiri in Mzimba District. After a short stay at Mabiri, they left for Ufipa in Tanzania where they lived for eight years before returning to Malawi after the death of Zwangendaba. They finally settled at Ng’onga in the Henga Valley in 1855 where M’mbelwa was installed as Chief in 1857. The group that was led by Ngwane Maseko arrived in Malawi and settled in Ntcheu in 1837. After a short stay, they left for Songea in southern Tanzania where they lived for some time before returning to Malawi. They finally settled in Ntcheu in 1867. Today, the Ngoni of Ntcheu have spread to other districts such as Mchinji and Dedza in the centre, and Mwanza and Neno in the south. The Ngoni have their language also known as Chingoni.
 Sena
Just like the Lomwe, the Sena also came from Mozambique. They entered Malawi through the south and settled in the Lower Shire area in Chikwawa and Nsanje Districts where they are still found today. Their language of communication is Chisena.
Tonga
The Tonga came from Viphya in northern Malawi to settle along the shores of Lake Malawi. They are an offshoot of several tribes who split from Tumbuka settlement at Jenjewe on the banks of Lupachi River. Kabunduli, from one of the split groups, was the leader of the group that moved to the east and settled at the Lake. The Tonga cover the area from Dwangwa River in Nkhotakota to as far north as Usisya, beyond Nkhata-Bay Boma. Their language of communication is called Chitonga.  
Tumbuka
The Tumbuka formerly known as the Nkhamanga are believed to have come from Congo. They entered Malawi through Tanzania. The people lived in family clans. Some of the most important clans were the Mkandawire, Luhanga, Kachali, Kumwenda, Msowoya, Harawa among others. The Nkhamanga established their kingdom in northern Malawi. The kingdom was located between Nyika Plateau to the north, Dwangwa River to the south, Luangwa River to the west and Lake Malawi to the east. The main occupation of the Tumbuka was and still remains farming. They grow crops such as maize, millet and tobacco. They also introduced iron smelting this is evidenced by a number of iron smelting furnaces found in area where the Tumbuka settled. The Tumbuka had no overall leader as was the case with the Chewa not until when the Nkhamanga kingdom became popular with the coming in of the Balowoka. The Balowoka crossed Lake Malawi to enter Nkhamanga territory. They came from Ubena in the south of present Tanzania around 1850 AD. They soon became new leaders and formed a kingdom under Chikulamayembe.  Some of the contributions of Nkhamanga to present Malawi include farming, hunting, iron smelting, trade as well as language, Tumbuka, which is widely spoken in the northern Malawi and the neighbouring Zambia. The Nkhamanga kingdom declined because of the coming in of Europeans and Swahili traders who weakened their trade, rebellion by sub-chiefs and Ngoni attack who fought and defeated Chikulamayembe.
Today, the Tumbuka are under the Paramount Chief (Themba la Mathemba) Chikulamayembe whose Headquarters is in Bolero, Rumphi District.  Today the Tumbuka hold an annual cultural event in Rumphi District in August/September known as Gonapamuhanya to celebrate the Chikulamayembe Dynasty.


Yao
Just like the Lomwe, the Yao are said to have come from Mozambique. They entered Malawi from the east. The Yao did not have an overall leader; they had several leaders when they entered Malawi. When they entered Malawi, they settled in areas along the lakeshore. The Yao speak their language known as Chiyao.
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